W. Renee' Acosta, R.Ph., M.S.

Clinical Associate Professor
College of Pharmacy

The University of Texas at Austin

As a pharmacy professor, it is important for me to show the students the relevance of the information being provided so that they can understand how to apply it in their practice setting. I want to instill in them the knowledge and tools they need to be successful practitioners and to develop the confidence to use their knowledge and skills. I incorporate stories and examples from my own career to provide students with real world examples of how to apply the information, and I share my successes as well as my failures as a pharmacist.

Return to Top

 

Shaun Dennis Black, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of Chemistry

The University of Texas at Tyler

“Never forget what it was like to be an undergraduate,” is something I promised myself early in my career, and it has remained a part of my teaching philosophy to this day. A good instructor will always be compassionate and caring, and I strive to bring those virtues into the lecture hall or laboratory every time I enter. I “set the bar high” to encourage my students to reach expectations that will help them succeed and excel and I believe in “relentless preparation” for each teaching encounter.

Return to Top

 

John Peter Blood, AIA

Senior Lecturer
School of Architecture and Deparment of Radio-Television-Film

The University of Texas at Austin





Return to Top

 

George S. Christian

Adjunct Professor
Department of English

The University of Texas at Austin

Literature and writing are human activities that assume the existence of community and the imperative of politics. In the classroom these assumptions come into the open where we can seem them, turn them over and talk about them. Students can only learn to communicate by doing it, but learning to do it—and to do it with confidence, a necessary life and career skill—is not easy. This skill is what I seek to teach.

Return to Top

 

Jonathan Davis-Secord, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
English Department and Classics Program

The University of Texas at Arlington

I approach teaching as a job of intersections. I believe that for students to fully engage with, understand and value a text, it must be presented within its original cultural milieu. One of my major responsibilities is to help students find the connections between the contexts of a work and the literary and linguistic choices of that work. Education, however, must also be an intersection of another sort: a cooperative effort shared by both professor and student. Full and true learning takes place only when professor and students together participate actively in the process.

Return to Top

 

Antonella Del Fattore-Olson

Distinguished Senior Lecturer
Department of French and Italian

The University of Texas at Austin

My broad aim, both professionally and personally, is to create a strong sense of community within the classroom so that we all learn from each other and grow together. It is my hope that the solidarity forged within my classes can transcend a given semester and that students will remain engaged with the Italian language and culture in their immediate and long-term future. It is for this reason that I have undertaken two initiatives in particular: the Rome Study Program that I direct every summer and the Italian Drama Workshop, in which my greatest satisfaction comes from the enduring bond I build with students.

Return to Top

 

Virgilio Gonzalez, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Electrical and Computer Engineering

The University of Texas at El Paso

Engineering is an applied discipline where the sciences join the imagination to create something useful. Future engineers need more than theories; they need the ability to apply them to real problems. I have the fortune to share several years of engineering practice with my students and enjoy when we discover and build new things together.

Return to Top

 

Kamal Sarkar, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Mechanical Engineering

The University of Texas-Pan American

In my mind, the duty of a teacher is to foster a passion for knowledge in students. Ultimately, students are our ambassadors. Their success is our success!

Return to Top

 

Catherine Stacy

Assistant Dean; Lecturer
Division of Statistics and Scientific Computation, College of Natural Sciences

The University of Texas at Austin

I see every lecture, every assignment and every exam as an opportunity to create a meaningful learning experience for students. I remember what it was like to be bored as a student and I resolved never to let my students feel that way if I could help it. What I didn’t anticipate about teaching is what an incredible gift it has been to journey alongside my students as they discover who they are called to be. The real rewards of teaching continue to come in those individual conversations outside of class.

Return to Top

 

Daniel Tablada, Jr., M.B.A.

Lecturer II
Department of Marketing, College of Business

The University of Texas at San Antonio

My teaching and mentoring philosophy is to convey content knowledge in ways that challenge students to engage in higher-order thinking, understand its value in real-world settings and actively apply it in a creative and meaningful way. I also strongly value the diversity and cultural perspectives that each student brings to the classroom.

Return to Top

 

Kathleen C. Tice, Ph.D.

Clinical Faculty
Literacy Studies, Department of Curriculum and Instruction

The University of Texas at Arlington

When teaching entails solely presenting information, we leave too much to chance because we ask students to navigate on their own. Instead, we can provide learning communities where people learn from others and through their own contributions. We can make it possible for students to engage in the type of thinking that people engage in who are competent in a discipline. We can help students reach high standards even when they have set the bar low, and we can refuse to give up, even when students have given up on themselves.

Return to Top

 

DeAnna Kay Varela

Senior Lecturer
Women's Studies Program

The University of Texas at El Paso

My teaching philosophy and values reflect my overall commitment to social justice and change through education. I see teaching as an extension of my background as an activist and work with non-profits. As a facilitator of student-centered learning and success I strive to create a safe environment where students are able to take risks, share their personal experience and knowledge and practice new aptitudes.

Return to Top

 

Nilakshi Veerabathina, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Physics

The University of Texas at Arlington

My teaching philosophy is guided by the ideal of service to students in particular and society in general. I believe that a teacher who can identify the individual learning needs of the students and serves such needs can positively influence the students for the rest of their lives. As a teacher of Astronomy, my purpose is to motivate my students to be self-directed, excited and engaged in a process of lifelong learning and critical thinking that will help them succeed in a knowledge driven world and contribute to the scientific advancement of the society. My constant endeavor is to help students understand science as a creative human activity which allows development of new technologies that offer solutions to numerous practical problems confronting the society.

Return to Top

 

Deborah Rush Walker, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

The University of Texas at Austin

Sometimes chemistry can be confusing, particularly when it involves items and events we cannot see directly. I choose to make it relatable via analogies, stories, role play, props and simulations. When students can relate to a topic, they build a passion for learning and apply its principles to tackle life's complex problems.

Return to Top

 

Diana Younger, M.A.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

The University of Texas of the Permian Basin

One of the most important things I can do to motivate students is to be enthusiastic about what I am teaching. Such a zest for the subject and process of learning can be contagious and draws students into the learning conversation. I want them to realize the connection between the physical body and behavior and be both curious and in awe of human and animal capabilities.

Return to Top

The University of Texas System. Nine Universities. Six Health Institutions. Unlimited Possibilities. www.utsystem.edu