Trisha A. Ainsa, Ph.D.

Minnie Stephens Piper Foundation Teaching Award; Burlington Resources Foundation Distinguished Award for Teaching Excellence; University Distinguished Teaching Award; University Distinguished Service to Students Award; Professor of Early Childhood Education and Special Education
College of Education

The University of Texas at El Paso

My students begin their journeys with their own inner gifts and talents, most often hidden in a place where they cannot find them-deep inside. UTEP students are known as Miners. It is fitting that their scholarship should involve mining for those nuggets of inner wisdom that taken together, become a cohesive whole for each. There are thousands of teaching and learning ideas that are yet to be discovered. My students will have some of those ideas, and I will have the proud pleasure of learning from them so that I continually get better at what I do.

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Anitesh Barua

William F. Wright Centennial Professor of Information Systems
McCombs School of Business

The University of Texas at Austin

For me, research and teaching are two sides of the same coin; one is about the creation of new knowledge, while the other involves sharing the same in an accessible way to inspire bright, young minds. My teaching philosophy is to help students see problems in innovative ways by integrating cutting edge knowledge from seemingly diverse disciplines such as Information Systems, Finance and Marketing. I challenge them to reach beyond the confines of conventional thinking and to develop novel solutions to real-world business problems.

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Oguzhan Bayrak, Ph.D., P.E.

Director, Phil M. Ferguson Structural Engineering Laboratory; Professor of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering; Charles Elmer Rowe Fellow in Cockrell School of Engineering
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

The University of Texas at Austin

Like the profession itself, the education of “structural engineers in the making” exists between two competing factors: disciplined ways of thinking and a freedom to create. In the eyes of students, there is a fine line between a well-organized series of lectures and an overly regimented course. Student aversion to an overly-regimented learning environment is rooted in the intellectual freedom needed to strike a balance between structural form and function. I try to balance the learning environment in my classes through highly-organized lectures and more open-ended design assignments and projects. This seemingly simple concept is very complex, and quite frankly, very important.

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Douglas Bruster

Mody C. Boatright Regents Professor of American and English Literature
Department of English

The University of Texas at Austin

Reading carefully is the very basis of effective citizenship. I feel privileged to be able to help students improve their analytical skills by introducing them to some of the richest texts in the English language.

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Ezra Cappell, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of English and Director of the Inter-American Jewish Studies Program
English Department and Inter-American Jewish Studies Program

The University of Texas at El Paso

In each of my courses I actively encourage my students to think beyond the classroom so they may understand the connection between literature and the real world, and thereby become cosmopolitan citizens of the global intellectual community. Each semester I have the honor and privilege of interacting with students who help me continually refine my ideas. My students force me to rethink much of what I had previously thought about the world and my place within it. I know that at the end of each semester if I have done my job well, I will have taught my students to teach me. I know how much I have continually benefited from my students, as a teacher, scholar and most-importantly, as a human being.

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J. Aaron Cassill, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Biology

The University of Texas at San Antonio

A good teacher has a solid understanding of the material, a clear presentation style and a fair assessment system that is clearly comprehensible to the students. An excellent teacher brings all of that to the classroom and realizes that each student is a unique individual who has their own goals and needs and is prepared to work with each one to give them the optimal learning experience.

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Elisabeth A. Cawthon, Ph.D.

University Distinguished Teaching Professor; Associate Professor and Associate Chair
Department of History

The University of Texas at Arlington

Students fear that law is self-satisfied, complicated and perhaps irrelevant--a "system of wheels within wheels." I try to demystify and humanize legal history through role playing. Who better to explain England's Official Secrets Act than James Bond, untangle the Statute of Mortmain than Edward I, assess the Norman Conquest than an artisan who made the Bayeux Tapestry or depict Tyburn than Moll Cutpurse? Legal history can range from gruesome to silly, but I aim for it never to be boring.

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Christopher Conway, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Distinguished Teaching Professor
Department of Modern Languages

The University of Texas at Arlington

What I love about teaching is finding a way to tell a story about the subject matter, and then having my students help me tell that story. Whatever work I ask of my students, whether a formal literary analysis or the writing of poetry, I want them to develop the intellectual independence and self-confidence to be critical and creative thinkers. To achieve this, I teach my students about asking the right questions, evaluating sources and strategies for effective reasoning and persuasion. Ultimately, these are not academic skills but life skills essential for the functioning of free people in a democratic society.

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Joseph Rene Corbeil, Ed.D.

Associate Professor
Educational Technology Department of Teaching Learning & Innovation

The University of Texas at Brownsville

My philosophy of teaching is rooted in the belief that our students are the most important people on campus; that teaching is the most important responsibility of the faculty; and that student learning and success are the most important outcomes of teaching.

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Tracy Dahlby

Professor and Frank A. Bennack, Jr. Chair in Journalism
School of Journalism

The University of Texas at Austin

I like to remind my students that education is a lifelong pursuit and journalism is one of the best vehicles for fostering continuous learning. It can introduce us to unforgettable people and mind-stretching ways of looking at and dealing with life. My goal is to help students develop the curiosity, methodology and confidence it takes to get out into the world and follow what really matters to them with gusto and at depth.

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Dr. Georgianna Duarte

Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, Early Childhood Education

The University of Texas at Brownsville

My teaching philosophy reflects a challenging but playful journey based on a foundation of joy, passion, intense inquiry and constant analysis of the research. I believe that each teacher has the potential to empower, to change and to inspire. I want my students to take risks, question with energy and explore through research and learning. Teaching and learning are truly meaningful through community-based research and intentional service experiences. My approach is to afford students regional and international opportunities. I believe through communication I can guide my students through issues of early development, justice and equity. I have an important role in guiding our students to examine who they are and that they have the power to make a difference in the lives of children and families.

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Sheldon Ekland-Olson

Rapoport Centennial Professor
Department of Sociology

The University of Texas at Austin

When teaching, I aim to help students think carefully. Careful thinking comes from engagement, discovery and a sense of importance. Engaging students, encouraging discovery and imparting a sense of importance form the foundation of all that I do when teaching.

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Victoria A. Farrar-Myers, Ph.D.

Full Professor of Political Science; Distinguished Teaching Professor
Department of Political Science

The University of Texas at Arlington

Teaching is more than just carefully designed course content to create meaningful connections throughout the semester; to me, it is the ultimate form of mentorship. It is an opportunity to challenge students to open their minds to new ideas, to challenge them to strive for what they may never even dreamed possible, and be there as a safety net when they fall short or just need a reassuring voice to say “I believe you can.” This student-centered approach has always been at the core of how I sought to engage my students in the learning enterprise, and the way I challenge myself to strive for deeper understanding of my subject matter and the manner in which I convey it.

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Arturo A. Fuentes, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and BSME Program Director
Department of Mechanical Engineering

The University of Texas-Pan American

To current and prospective engineering students, I demonstrate my passion and enthusiasm for the subject matter and my commitment to their academic and professional success. I strive to provide the best educational experience and to promote high standards by being a role model. My teaching efforts include designing and implementing effective student challenges that take place inside and outside the classroom. These motivate and engage students and provide formative feedback to help them achieve their full potential.

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James D. Garrison

Archibald A. Hill Professor of English and American Literature
Department of English

The University of Texas at Austin

My philosophy of teaching is informed by one consistent goal, and that is to encourage students to share my own love of great books. As a teacher of literature, I want them to think of the class not as an end but as a beginning, as a starting point for a lifetime of thoughtful reading.

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Peter Golding, Ph.D., C.P.Eng.

Associate Professor
Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

The University of Texas at El Paso

The success of our students is primary. And what a joy it is that through practice of our profession we help students succeed. My Grandpa used to recite a verse that concluded with "there is nothing to equal the gladness and joy of making and keeping friends." Teaching comes close!

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Eric A. Hagedorn

Associate Professor of Physics
Department of Physics

The University of Texas at El Paso

My teaching philosophy can be summarized by three words: caring, clarifying and connecting. I care deeply about my students and their success. I am passionate about physics and want to clarify ideas students find difficult so they can share my passion. I want facilitate genuine human connections and the connections of ideas into useful cognitive frameworks.

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Laura Lunstrum Hall, Ph.D.

Ph.D. Project Professor
Department of Information and Decision Sciences

The University of Texas at El Paso

Taking students out of the classroom and into the community builds networks, fosters confidence in students and provides real world experience while contributing critical resources to our local schools, non-profits and various organizations. Building learning environments that extend beyond the walls of the classroom allow students to develop a greater sense of community responsibility and prepares them to be strong role models for other underrepresented minority students in the region. Bringing choice and opportunity to students, many of them the first in their family to go to college, is an exciting and rewarding privilege and I am fully committed to helping my students achieve the highest level of educational attainment possible.

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Helen Hammond, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Educational Psychology and Special Services

The University of Texas at El Paso

My professional goal has always been to be a great teacher who inspires our students to become great teachers. I have always believed it is critical that students in my classes at UTEP become enthusiastic about the teaching profession and working with children with disabilities and their families.

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Joseph Michael Izen, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Physics

The University of Texas at Dallas

Physics is a perspective on how to understand the world and an approach to solving problems. Physicists take joy from what humans have already understood and we revel in the pursuit of what we have yet to understand. In the classroom, I offer the physicist's world view on the same platter as physical theory, with a healthy dose of demonstrations, word play and inside jokes. Physics can be taught, but love of physics and respect for others have to be demonstrated. I try to pass on to my students that gift which my professors shared with me, and if my students are fortunate, someday they will have their own students to inspire.

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Steven J. Kachelmeier, Ph.D., CPA

Randal B. McDonald Chair in Accounting
Department of Accounting

The University of Texas at Austin

If a teacher is not passionate about the subject matter, one can hardly expect students to feel otherwise. Teaching auditing is a privilege because I firmly believe that a sound audit function provides a profound benefit to society. Through a blend of discussion, cases, student presentations and a little humor along the way, my students and I discover that benefit.

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Kenneth A. Lawson, Ph.D.

Professor and Division Head; Mannino Fellow
Health Outcomes and Pharmacy Practice Division, College of Pharmacy

The University of Texas at Austin

One of my primary goals as a teacher is to connect with my students in a way that shows my strong interest in their learning and professional development. I strive to help students understand the relevance of the material, cultivate their critical thinking skills, motivate them to become lifelong learners, instill a sense of professionalism and accountability, and to learn from them. I love being with the students and I care about them as individuals—I always try to convey my sincere interest in their academic and professional success.

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Beili Liu, MFA

Associate Professor and Director, Foundations Program
Department of Art and Art History; Affiliate, Center for Asian American Studies

The University of Texas at Austin

I believe that the role of a teacher is to help students develop into independent, aware, culturally sensitive and creative individuals. My teaching guides students to gain critical visual and conceptual skills in thinking and making. As a practicing artist, I often find myself sharing projects, processes and experiences in the art world with students. Being active with my own creativity feeds energy into my connection with students. This active interaction engages students and encourages them to discover their own creative expression in art making.

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Randall D. Manteufel, Ph.D., P.E.

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering

The University of Texas at San Antonio

Students want courses that are clear, organized, relevant, and engaging. I strive to exceed their expectations.

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Susan E. Mickey

Professor of Design; Senior Associate Chair; Head of Design and Technology
Department of Theatre and Dance

The University of Texas at Austin

Mentoring and teaching are a combination of active professional practice, thoughtful listening and intuitive timing. I try to embody an active practice of creative problem solving, critical intellectual analysis, vigorous communication, successful collaboration, a contextual understanding of the work and effective leadership. These core competencies form the heart of my pedagogical mission and my central goal for each student in my care.

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Caroline Suzanne Miles, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of English

The University of Texas-Pan American

In my students, I aim to cultivate intellectual curiosity, creativity and the desire for lifelong learning, instill the practical individual and collaborative skills necessary to be successful in the workforce, and encourage a sense of civic responsibility and ethical regard for others in regional, national and global contexts. I work to develop a dynamic curriculum that is relevant to my students’ lives and futures, that pushes them to think beyond their comfort zone, and that will ultimately contribute to stronger communities. At the same time, rather than adhering to a strict teaching philosophy, I constantly rethink and revise my approach to teaching through an ongoing dialogue with new pedagogies and technologies, my students and the environment in which I teach.

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Theresa O'Halloran, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology

The University of Texas at Austin

A special challenge of teaching biology is the perception of many students that science is merely a collection of facts. I would like the students in my classes to understand that science is an active process, that science is centered on critical thinking and that the story is constantly evolving. To foster this understanding, the atmosphere in my classroom is punctuated with noise as students interact to examine experimental data, form alternate hypotheses and propose new experiments to test their ideas. The sound of engaged students keeps teaching alive for me.

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James N. Olson, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

The University of Texas of the Permian Basin

I want my students to employ informed skepticism and evidence-based criticism of concepts to which they are exposed. I want to see light bulbs come on. In order to maximize the likelihood that this occurs in my classroom and online courses, I try to create an environment which has as its foundation an unconditional positive regard for the student. I assume each student is competent to learn and that nurturing prompts, encouragement, and positive comments go a long way toward transforming each student's ability into skillful and insightful performance.

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P. Elizabeth Pate, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching

The University of Texas at San Antonio

As a teacher, I describe myself as a progressive educator. Systems thinking, democratic education and service-learning serve as the framework influencing my teaching (and integrated research and service). In my classes, there is intentional collaboration between the students and myself regarding what, why and how learning occurs.

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K.J. (Jamie) Rogers, Ph.D., P.E.

Distinguished Teaching Professor and Associate Chair
Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering

The University of Texas at Arlington

Engineers create things that change the world, and the importance of educating future engineers has never been more critical. I strive to work in partnership with students in an atmosphere of mutual respect, effective communication and timely feedback. It is my goal that students see learning can be fun and realize that learning is a lifelong endeavor to be approached with enthusiasm.

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Cinthia Salinas


The University of Texas at Austin

Capturing what ought to happen in a classroom is incredibly difficult. Given the linguistic, cultural and intellectual diversity of our world, teachers and students in a reciprocal relationship create unique dynamics there are loosely framed by histories and stances. As an educator, I believe that the excitement and rewards of teaching and learning exist when teachers remain open to new ideas, learners are set free to explore possibilities and classrooms serve as the places for little and great moments to occur.

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Can Saygin, Ph.D.

Professor
Mechanical Engineering

The University of Texas at San Antonio

I am a strong believer of active learning. I find it most effective when there is interaction on a frequent basis between me and students, as well as among students, in a controlled manner during class. Teaching, delivered in the form of a monolog, is wasted time in terms of learning effectiveness. Therefore, every time I find myself talking for more than 10 minutes straight without creating student interaction, I tell myself “Shut up and teach!”

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Michael B. Stoff, Ph.D.

Director of the Plan II Honors Program at the University of Texas at Austin, Associate Professor of History and University Distinguished Teaching Associate Professor
Department of History

The University of Texas at Austin

Teaching is nurturing, not just of each student’s mind but of the whole person, not just in the classroom but outside of it as well, whether on the beaches of Normandy, the streets of London or Berlin or in my own home, where my wife and I host book discussions, award dinners and receptions for my students. If you think of it as nurturance, teaching can take place anywhere. And it’s a full-time job. For me, there could be no finer one.

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